Look Forward, Let Go.

pixelatedtoys:

I cant help right now, but hopefully some of y’all can.

pulpfanfiction:


nayx:

Print it.  Fuck it.

am i supposed to laugh at “print it. fuck it.” or the fact that the dude is the fucking same guy as the little advertisement in the same position im so confused


this is a Perfect Photograph

pulpfanfiction:

nayx:

Print it.  Fuck it.

am i supposed to laugh at “print it. fuck it.” or the fact that the dude is the fucking same guy as the little advertisement in the same position im so confused

this is a Perfect Photograph

naamahdarling:

littleninarescue:

This is Little Nina.  We found her on the side of the road in Cleveland Ohio, covered in mud and getting splashed by cars. I picked her up with intentions of nursing her back to health. The vet was kind enough to give me a free exam, which was enough to tell me that she has a severe upper respiratory infection and extreme malnutrition. Her eyes were glued shit with yellow gunk when I found her. And the vet told me that she thought she was about 5 weeks old, but was the size of a 3 week old kitten.
We already have two cats, both of which are rescues. We have plans on keeping her, but this was such a surprise for us, we didn’t have time to budget in another cat. I was able to get a sample sized tube of antibiotics for her eyes, but she is going to need more very soon. And eventually she will need to be spayed.
I don’t want to have to give her up because we can’t afford to keep her. Nina has a gofundme account set up for her vet bills. Please send what ever you can afford. She would greatly appreciate the chance to survive and stay in a nice warm home.
http://www.gofundme.com/bh8z7c
I don’t have much to offer for rewards, but this blog will follow Nina’s journey as she grows into a healthy cat! If you leave your address with a donation, we will send you a picture of her (when she is plump and healthy!) and a thank you letter.
Nina thanks you for taking the time to read this post! And may karma bring the best of luck your way!

Jesus Christ.
Please reblog.  I can’t donate, but maybe someone else can.

naamahdarling:

littleninarescue:

This is Little Nina.
We found her on the side of the road in Cleveland Ohio, covered in mud and getting splashed by cars. I picked her up with intentions of nursing her back to health. The vet was kind enough to give me a free exam, which was enough to tell me that she has a severe upper respiratory infection and extreme malnutrition. Her eyes were glued shit with yellow gunk when I found her. And the vet told me that she thought she was about 5 weeks old, but was the size of a 3 week old kitten.

We already have two cats, both of which are rescues. We have plans on keeping her, but this was such a surprise for us, we didn’t have time to budget in another cat. I was able to get a sample sized tube of antibiotics for her eyes, but she is going to need more very soon. And eventually she will need to be spayed.

I don’t want to have to give her up because we can’t afford to keep her. Nina has a gofundme account set up for her vet bills. Please send what ever you can afford. She would greatly appreciate the chance to survive and stay in a nice warm home.

http://www.gofundme.com/bh8z7c

I don’t have much to offer for rewards, but this blog will follow Nina’s journey as she grows into a healthy cat! If you leave your address with a donation, we will send you a picture of her (when she is plump and healthy!) and a thank you letter.

Nina thanks you for taking the time to read this post! And may karma bring the best of luck your way!

Jesus Christ.

Please reblog.  I can’t donate, but maybe someone else can.

mochte replied to your post “Tournament Saga: the Writeup, Part 4”

You should always have a bagel on hand, no matter what you’re doing- but especially when you perform Bag-el-ua. (DO YOU SEE THE HIDDEN JOKE HERE MICHAEL)

mochte replied to your post “Tournament Saga: the Writeup, Part 2”

I’m very pleased with Nicola for taking such good care of you. <3 Good.

She really was an excellent influence. Oh!

image

Here’s a picture of her right after she accepted the silver medal, shaking hands with the person she handily won against in Restricted Step.

Nicola is so tiny.

diekiwifrucht answered to your link “Florida teacher suspended for twerking with students at party”

simple answer: “twerk” has become a buzzword that will instantly get a shitton of clicks around the web. but rly tho wtf

it makes me feel like 

Stop romanticizing neurotypicality

realsocialskills:

When I hear people, autistic or otherwise, talk about autistic social difficulties, they often say things along the lines of:

  • "You and I just know all of these rules intuitively, but people with autism find them mysterious and have to learn them explicitly"
  • "All of these rules that you neurotypicals pick up naturally are very very difficult for those of us on the spectrum"

There is a myth people who aren’t autistic just automatically know social rules, and that it’s only autistic people who need to put serious effort into learning them.

It’s not true. Neurotypical people have to learn all kinds of things on purpose. For instance:

In business:

  • When people are applying to schools, or first learning how to apply to jobs, they are advised to do practice interviews. This is not special advice for the disabled; it’s standard advice for everyone
  • Colleges have career centers aimed at teaching students how to get jobs
  • Ask A Manager is a popular column about social skills for the workplace, for every role including management, employees, and job seekers. It’s not aimed specifically at people with disabilities, most of the articles are written assuming a neurotypical audience and most of the questions are asked by people without disabilities
  • Fuck you, pay me is a popular talk about gaining the social skills to insist that your freelancing clients pay you for your work
  • Everyone, not just autistic people, needs to learn a lot of skills which may or may not come naturally, in order to succeed in businesses

In personal relationships:

  • Captain Awkward is a popular advice blog focused on personal relationships and boundaries. Many subscribers are autistic, but many are not, and it is not a disability-focused blog.
  • Miss Manners is a long-running column about manners. She has been printed in newspapers for decades and has written several books. She is popular because a lot of neurotypical people feel like they don’t know the rules and want someone to tell them the rules
  • Scarleteen, a popular sex ed site, has a lot of information on things like dating and relationships and how to talk about safer sex, because no one is born knowing those things

In the area of disability:

It’s true that there are many specific social difficulties that autistic people often have that people who lack autism generally do not have. For instance:

Receptive body language and tones of voice:

  • Some autistic people have trouble understanding body language, facial expressions, and tones of voice
  • This makes it hard to interact with people who assume as a matter of course that everyone understands what their body language and tones are saying, and that if you’re not responding, it’s because you’re choosing to ignore it
  • Autistic people who have this problem have to learn strategies for compensating for it
  • There are different approaches that some of us take (some people can explicitly learn how body language works by studying it, some people can learn to pick up on different cues, some people can learn how to guess based on context what someone might mean and ask explicitly, some people can move most of their interactions to text where it doesn’t matter, etc etc)

Language

  • Some autistic people have trouble with receptive language, and have trouble understanding what people say
  • Some of us have trouble with expressive language, and can’t say the socially expected thing in the socially expected way even if we know what it is
  • Some autistic people are unable to produce tones of voice or modulate volume in socially expected ways (some autistic people can learn this through practice/therapy; some can’t.)
  • Language difficulties also can interfere with social skills acquisition because people learn these skills and expected modes of behavior through practice, and people whose receptive and expressive language is atypical tend to be excluded from contexts in which most people practice and learn these things
  • Similarly to reading body language, different autistic people learn different ways of dealing with this. 

Movement

  • Some autistic people have trouble with voluntary motion, and may not be able to do some expected social gestures or movement even if they understand the rules perfectly
  • Some autistic people get stuck in situations in which it is considered socially important to keep moving (eg: in line, in a movie theater, at the end of a ride)
  • Some autistic people need to move in ways that are socially stigmatized in order to function
  • Some autistic people do not have the motor control (or cognitive ability, there are several reasons this can happen) necessary to produce speech, and communicate using AAC devices, RPM, books of picture symbols, or FC. (Most neurotypical people (and probably most autistic people as well) lack the social skills necessary to interact respectfully with people who communicate this way. This creates a social difficulty that gets blamed on lack of speech, but which is actually caused by lack of respect.) 

Sensory issues:

  • Many autistic people are unable to tolerate the noises, sounds, smells, lights, or crowds in places that most people like to socialize
  • Some autistic people can’t tolerate being outdoors for long periods of time
  • This complicates socializing or business networking in a world that expects social interactions to take place in those kinds of settings

There are any number of other examples of ways that autistic people have to learn skills that neurotypical people usually do not have to learn. But that doesn’t mean that we are uniquely deficient, or that “having to learn social rules” is an autistic thing.

No one is born knowing the rules. Everyone has to learn the rules, and everyone has to learn some of the rules explicitly. Everyone learns how to interact with others over a period of years, and no one is good at it without practice. For neurotypical people, the need to learn social skills is treated as normal, expected, and honorable.

For autistic people, our need to learn social skills is treated as disgusting, defective, and in need of normalizing therapy.

People teach us that we autistic people, specifically, are bad at people and interaction and that this needs to be corrected. It’s not true. We are not uniquely bad at social interaction. We have specific needs to learn specific things.

Some of the social skills we have to learn are coping mechanisms for being heavily stigmatized. We have to learn these skills because something is wrong with society, not because something is wrong with us.

There are skills we have to learn differently because of physical differences between autistic and neurotypical people, but that is not something we are missing either. They treat us like we are neurotypical with missing pieces that need to be filled in, but this is not true. We are a different shape, and that’s ok. 

(And there are also social skills that come more easily to autistic people than neurotypical people. Autism is not solely composed of difficulties.)

Everyone needs to learn how to interact with others, and it is a lifelong process. The ways neurotypical people learn social interactions are respected. The ways autistic and other neurodivergent people learn to interact with others should also be respected. The fact that autistic social learning is stigmatized is a problem with society, not autistic people.

Toad Words

jumpingjacktrash:

the-real-seebs:

ursulavernon:

            Frogs fall out of my mouth when I talk. Toads, too.

            It used to be a problem.

            There was an incident when I was young and cross and fed up parental expectations. My sister, who is the Good One, has gold fall from her lips, and since I could not be her, I had to go a different way.

            So I got frogs. It happens.

            “You’ll grow into it,” the fairy godmother said. “Some curses have cloth-of-gold linings.” She considered this, and her finger drifted to her lower lip, the way it did when she was forgetting things. “Mind you, some curses just grind you down and leave you broken. Some blessings do that too, though. Hmm. What was I saying?”

            I spent a lot of time not talking. I got a slate and wrote things down. It was hard at first, but I hated to drop the frogs in the middle of the road. They got hit by cars, or dried out, miles away from their damp little homes.

            Toads were easier. Toads are tough. After awhile, I learned to feel when a word was a toad and not a frog. I could roll the word around on my tongue and get the flavor before I spoke it. Toad words were drier. Desiccated is a toad word. So is crisp and crisis and obligation. So are elegant and matchstick.

            Frog words were a bit more varied. Murky. Purple. Swinging. Jazz.

I practiced in the field behind the house, speaking words over and over, sending small creatures hopping into the evening.  I learned to speak some words as either toads or frogs. It’s all in the delivery.

            Love is a frog word, if spoken earnestly, and a toad word if spoken sarcastically. Frogs are not good at sarcasm.

            Toads are masters of it.

            I learned one day that the amphibians are going extinct all over the world, that some of them are vanishing. You go to ponds that should be full of frogs and find them silent. There are a hundred things responsible—fungus and pesticides and acid rain.

            When I heard this, I cried “What!?” so loudly that an adult African bullfrog fell from my lips and I had to catch it. It weighed as much as a small cat. I took it to the pet store and spun them a lie in writing about my cousin going off to college and leaving the frog behind.

            I brooded about frogs for weeks after that, and then eventually, I decided to do something about it.

            I cannot fix the things that kill them. It would take an army of fairy godmothers, and mine retired long ago. Now she goes on long cruises and spreads her wings out across the deck chairs.

            But I can make more.

            I had to get a field guide at first. It was a long process. Say a word and catch it, check the field marks. Most words turn to bronze frogs if I am not paying attention.

            Poison arrow frogs make my lips go numb. I can only do a few of those a day. I go through a lot of chapstick.  

            It is a holding action I am fighting, nothing more. I go to vernal pools and whisper sonnets that turn into wood frogs. I say the words squeak and squill and spring peepers skitter away into the trees. They begin singing almost the moment they emerge.

            I read long legal documents to a growing audience of Fowler’s toads, who blink their goggling eyes up at me. (I wish I could do salamanders. I would read Clive Barker novels aloud and seed the streams with efts and hellbenders. I would fly to Mexico and read love poems in another language to restore the axolotl. Alas, it’s frogs and toads and nothing more. We make do.)

            The woods behind my house are full of singing. The neighbors either learn to love it or move away.

            My sister—the one who speaks gold and diamonds—funds my travels. She speaks less than I do, but for me and my amphibian friends, she will vomit rubies and sapphires. I am grateful.

            I am practicing reading modernist revolutionary poetry aloud. My accent is atrocious. Still, a day will come when the Panamanian golden frog will tumble from my lips, and I will catch it and hold it, and whatever word I spoke, I’ll say again and again, until I stand at the center of a sea of yellow skins, and make from my curse at last a cloth of gold.

Terri Windling posted recently about the old fairy tale of frogs falling from a girl’s lips, and I started thinking about what I’d do if that happened to me, and…well…

!.

You know how if you go through years and years of “best science fiction short stories”, every so often you find some short story you’ve never heard of before, but it’s just amazing and brilliant and leaves you wondering why you never read stories with that plot before? This is one of those.

Seriously, wow.

this made me smile.

i’m still smiling.

WHHHHAT

There’s so much “WHAT THE FUCKING SHIT” to this story, but a what stands out to me is

"According to these documents, ‘Coach Perry,’ as she’s called, was videotaped getting a lap dance by a student, even teaching students how to twerk."

this woman apparently GOT A GOD DAMN LAP DANCE from a student, but they lead with “twerking.” They DON’T EVEN MENTION THE LAPDANCE IN THE HEADLINE

How the fuck

do you even

make that decision

Like “TEACHER PUBLICLY GETS LAPDANCE FROM STUDENT ON VIDEO” isn’t sensational enough? Teaching them twerking is fucking weird, but THAT shit has GOT to be illegal, right?

lookforwardletgo:

What the hell, the “read more”s aren’t working let me fix

yes they are but not on mobile, do “read more”s not work on mobile

What the hell, the “read more”s aren’t working let me fix

yonkoshanks:

crowleythxangel:

ninjutsumistress:

stormxsparrow:

If you went or know anyone who went to SDCC and saw this cosplayer, the police seriously need your help. _The cosplayer was found at the side of a road unconscious and bloody without her ID and in her costume. The police are unsure what happened to her. If you have ANY information or saw her anywhere, call The San Diego Police Department at (619) 531-2000 or (858) 484-3154.PLEASE Spread the message.Personal note: I am not personally involved with the situation, I have not been to that con nor seen the cosplayer only saw the issue being raised on Facebook, so I’m raising more awareness on here. More infomation: x

Reblogging in hopes this case get solved fast!

come on tumblr this needs more notes

THIS IS MY FRIEND MILLY! SHE’S IN THE HOSPITAL IN ICU STILL IN SAN DIEGO WITH SEVERE BRAIN BLEEDING. PLEASE reblog this and let the police know if you have any information! 

yonkoshanks:

crowleythxangel:

ninjutsumistress:

stormxsparrow:

If you went or know anyone who went to SDCC and saw this cosplayer, the police seriously need your help. _

The cosplayer was found at the side of a road unconscious and bloody without her ID and in her costume. The police are unsure what happened to her. 

If you have ANY information or saw her anywhere, call The San Diego Police Department at (619) 531-2000 or (858) 484-3154.
PLEASE Spread the message.

Personal note: I am not personally involved with the situation, I have not been to that con nor seen the cosplayer only saw the issue being raised on Facebook, so I’m raising more awareness on here. More infomation: x

Reblogging in hopes this case get solved fast!

come on tumblr this needs more notes

THIS IS MY FRIEND MILLY! SHE’S IN THE HOSPITAL IN ICU STILL IN SAN DIEGO WITH SEVERE BRAIN BLEEDING. PLEASE reblog this and let the police know if you have any information! 

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

thephilyptian:

"PALESTINIAN GIRL, YOUNGEST DOCTOR IN THE WORLD"

"When someone enrols in the medicine school that one of the longest schooling required profession, by the time they finish school they will be around 30-or at least on their late 20s. But not for this girl; Eqbal Asa’d is a Palestinian Muslim woman that started the Medicine school when she was just 14 years old, ‘myhijab.info’ reports. Asa’d got her Bachelor degree in Medicine with Honors and was set by the Guinness World Records as the youngest doctor in the World, according to the report. She has been signed to go to Ohio, U.S to continue her education even further and become a Pediatrician."  - Source

YOU GUYS SHE IS THE YOUNGEST DOCTOR IN THE WORLD. SHE IS A FEMALE, A MUSLIM AND A MINORITY. AND SHE IS THE YOUNGEST DOCTOR IN THE WORLD. 

WHY ARE WE NOT HEARING MORE ABOUT HER?

you know why.

Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]